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security challenges and the foreign policy challenges we face, i say that the number one challenge is getting our fiscal house in order. getting a handle on the debt, getting a handle on the deficit which are critical in order to get the economy growing again and people back to work. and i think that is the over -- it's certainly the number one domestic challenge. my point is it's always the number one national security challenge. why? because a healthy economy and a healthy balance sheet undergirds everything we do internationally. it funds our military, it gives strength to our diplomacy, it allows us to be an attractive trading partner which gives us economic influence. it undergirds everything we do overseas. but secondly, it also undergirds the power of the american idea. the american idea is political democracy and free markets makes for a stable situation in the long term but also makes for a prosperous society that is able to deliver on its people. that is really what america has stood for. and by our failure to resolve our own problems and get our economy growing and going
director and i'm delighted to see all of you here today. i think the interest in foreign policy in the wake of other presidential election is certainly evident by the standing room only crowd that we have here today. we are now already into the process of transition. transition even with the same president. transitions are the most fluid and receptive moments in the presidential cycle to have an impact on the policy process. and so i'm, i take it, as a good sign there is so much interest in the foreign policy process by your presence here today. now i think that the transition from a first to a second obama administration may of course begin the day after an election but it doesn't end on inauguration day. this process is going to continue for some time. as the president's new or old team takes shape and where necessary seeks confirmation. as the new old team goes through the inevitable period of reassessment and redefinition of priorities and opportunities, and as other issues, domestic issues, fiscal cliff, for example, impacts foreign policy, and let's not forget as the world recalibrate
partisan than i thought it would be including matters on foreign policy. it felt it first on the debate of the resolution to authorize president bush to go into kuwait to get hussein out. along the way, there have been many great moments of bipartisan achievement, and, in fact, i would say that of all of things i'm feeling good about that i've been a part of in the 24 years i've been in the senate, not a one of them have been partisan. .. >> be effective that is that you get 0%. >> senator kyl what happened? why this happened? >> forgive me for doing this, but think you doing this and thank you to "the wall street journal" for making this possible. mr. murdoch, it's great have a chance to visit with you. mr. prime minister, i haven't had a chance to visit with him as of yet. he is very good at this. i'm thinking about running for reelection. [laughter] john mccain and joe lieberman. the reason that joe came back -- what a wonderful lady she is. >> have you finished your rounds? >> a have to do that because i do appreciate this opportunity. i came to the congress in 1972 as a young fresh
reality. now second, there has, in fact, been a significant shift in foreign policy appetite and national security appetite, both on the part of the two parties, and on the part of the american public. and what do we mean when i say that? there is no appetite for another land war in asia, and there's no appetite for a continuing to lead were in asia that we've still got in afghanistan. and we just saw in the concluded presidential campaign that the candidate who had a wing of his party clergy pledging them to take the view that we should be in afghanistan longer, that we should do more in syria, that we should do something militarily and iran was continually pushed away from that by the more political politically minded wing of his party that was reading an internal polling which said, there's not much difference particularly on afghanistan it when republicans and democrats. so you don't have the demand side, if you will for the kind of military spending that we've seen over the last decade. you know longer have a public outcry for military spending on this scale as a response to terroris
in the christian conservative community. it does seem, to me, to have evolved. can you talk about foreign policy or gay individuals and how the christian community is now or conservative christian community is looking at those issues? >> yeah. i mean, we're still looking at the postelection survey that we, um, commissioned, that we got very early this morning, about 5 a.m. but the preliminary evidence is pretty consistent with what i've seen throughout my career, you know? there's a tendency to sort of caricature and stigmatize voters of devout faith and sort of suggest that they live in trailer parks, and they're poor, not educated and easy to command, and they cling to their guns and their religion, and they vote on gay marriage and abortion. not true. if you look at the evangelicals who voted yesterday, they voted on the economy and jobs by the exact same percentage that the entire electorate did. to put it in biblical terms, it rains on the righteous and the unrighteous alike. so evangelicals and faithful catholics are underwater on their mortgages. they're also struggling. they're trying to
heidi, the environment clearly a global challenge, clearly a part of the foreign policy. how does it fit into the economic statecraft? >> it fits into a lot of different things the state department is working on. what we as a relatively new office of seven months and only a few people have been working on are much more than the sort of geographic priorities that the secretary has highlighted, so i probably wouldn't be the best person to speak to this department with a whole host of environmental issues. a lot more time on the year autozone and the relationship and then there's a little bit of a list from the economic analysis perspective that we tend to spend most of our time on. >> all of the subjects but maybe everybody else would like a chance to do that, too. questions? i think there is a microphone here. is there another mic? going once -- if people don't have questions i will ask them. okay. >> the council of the land that. one of the things that we observed both in the atlanta environment and looking at the global companies that has to do with our competitive edge advantage in col
and security a center of u.s. foreign policy debate. this was hosted by the center for strategic and international studies. >> let me take a employment to welcome and introduce admiral fallon skipping the part how he walked across the tidal basin to get here today. he's a very, very dear friend. he's had senior commands. he was, of course, the head of the central command, was the head of the pacific command. he was instrumental in opening up our relations with china and establishing new relations with india. he is in every sense the, you know, the diplomat warrior, what we most admire in our unified combat and commanders. thank you, bill, to you, for doing this, and let's turn it over to you. >> thank you. [applause] thank you very much. [applause] first big step. thank you very much, and welcome, ladies and gentlemen. while we're getting settled here, i'll have our panelists come up and get settled into their chairs and order dessert, and those of you who missed the chow line, it may be too late. [laughter] then, again, i don't think too many in this room are starving, not the s
administrations to share information with those of us that are supposed to make critical foreign policy decisions and the budget process. very unwilling, and certainly this is another case of the. but i was struck as well that, you need to tell me the head of the cia uses gmail? [inaudible] >> to communicate? it just struck me that i'm very concerned about the. and, obviously, there will be some areas into this but i see this coming, and apparently he has agreed to testify, as he should, like everybody involved should be testifying in his and provide as much openness as possible. i look forward to the committee taking a lead on that. [inaudible] >> some of your colleagues on ssi, senate republicans are time of making a deal with with democrats to find a compromise. first of all, what do you make of those efforts? second, how far are you willing to go to to strike an immigration deal with democrats? >> well, that is a good question and i wouldn't have been surprised if i didn't hear it. i think that, i seen a bit of a pattern over the years of people coming into this congress and taking a look at
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8